Healthy New Year’s Resolutions

January 19, 2017 at 9:15 am | Posted in Health | Leave a comment
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By Annabella He
MGH Dietetic Intern

It’s 2017! At the start of year, you may be making a New Year’s resolution to better manage your diabetes by eating healthier and exercising more. In order to stick to the plan, your New Year’s resolutions should be specific, measurable and reasonable. The following are some specific tips to get you started. Pick one or a couple to work on!

  1. Cut down on portion size: The amount of food you eat for each meal has a huge impact on your blood glucose and weight control. Having a smaller meal keeps your glucose and insulin levels more stable. Also research shows that lowering total calorie intake helps with long-term weight loss, so portion control is the key. Use food labels and measuring cups to accurately gauge your intake.
  2. Eat breakfast: Have a filling breakfast to keep yourself full for longer. Eating breakfast reduces your hunger levels later in the day. A balanced breakfast like whole-wheat cereal with low fat milk and nuts, or scrambled egg with some vegetables are good options. Instead of topping the toast with butter, try avocado to make it tasty and healthy.
  3. Make a balanced plate: Fill half plate with fruits and vegetables, especially brightly colored ones, ¼ plate protein, ¼ plate starch.
  4. Eat more non-starchy vegetables: We always say eat more vegetables, but the kinds of vegetables we eat also matter. Starchy vegetables like corn, green peas, winter squash and potatoes are high in carbohydrate. Eating too much of those will increase your blood sugar, so it’s important to moderate the portion size of these vegetables. Non-starchy vegetables like carrots, broccoli, salad greens and beets contain little or no carbohydrate. Eating more of those vegetables not only stabilize your blood sugar level, but also help fill you up without gaining much weight.
  5. Choose healthy snacks: It’s okay to have some snacks throughout the day to keep your blood sugar stable and promote energy levels. Again, make sure to control the portion size and make healthy choices. Here are some examples of healthy snacks: whole fruits, cut vegetables, almonds, Greek yogurt and low-fat popcorn.
  6. Learn a new healthy recipe every month: Search for new healthy recipes and practice. Cooking at home is fun and it saves money. You are in full control of what’s in your meal. Also, by December, you will master cooking 12 recipes. How exciting is that?!
  7. Drink more water: The daily recommendation is 8 cups of water or other non-caffeinated beverages. Drinking enough water helps you stay hydrated and energetic. Sometimes you may feel hungry, but actually you are dehydrated. Drinking water helps you to not get hunger and thirst confused.
  8. Go to bed early and get enough sleep: Going to bed early keeps you from eating too late at night. Also, getting a good night sleep helps your body process carbohydrate and has a positive effect on weight control.
  9. Exercise more: Try different types of exercise such as walking, running, hiking, yoga or a group class at the gym. Get a pedometer or use phone app to record your steps while walking. Recording your steps can motivate you to try to reach a higher goal by walking more miles.
  10. Stay up to date with medical appointments: See your provider regularly to make sure everything is going well with your diabetes and that you are up to date on your health screenings (including eye exams).
Content reviewed by Melanie Pearsall, RD, CDE

Diabetes ABCs: Y

January 16, 2013 at 1:00 pm | Posted in Diabetes ABCs | Leave a comment
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You

Y

You are the center of your care team.  Our mission is to empower you to take charge of your health and live well, but ultimately you are the one in control.  Decide what motivates you to make healthy changes in your life – whether it’s exercising regularly, learning to prepare healthy meals, or simply checking your blood sugar regularly.  It’s a lot to handle, but know that no one expects you to be perfect.  If you start to feel overwhelmed or think you might be suffering from diabetes burnout, talk to your health care provider.  Mass General also offers regular diabetes support groups at the main campus and regional HealthCare Centers.

(Content reviewed by MGH Diabetes Center)

Diabetes ABCs: P

December 12, 2012 at 1:00 pm | Posted in Diabetes ABCs | Leave a comment
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Pre-diabetes
By Paula Cerqueira, Dietetic Intern

P

Pre-diabetes is a condition in which a person’s blood sugar levels are higher than what is considered to be normal, but not quite high as to denote diabetes.  According to the CDC, about 1 in 3 American adults have pre-diabetes.  Of those with pre-diabetes, 1/3 to 1/2 will develop diabetes within 5-10 years without intervention.

When people are in a pre-diabetic state, they may begin to develop significant cardiovascular and nerve damage.  However, diabetes is not an inevitable diagnosis.  Pre-diabetes can serve as an opportunity to develop healthy habits to prevent the progression to Type 2 Diabetes.  With such lifestyle changes as following a healthy diet, weight loss of 5% to 10% of body weight, at least 150 minutes per week of exercise, and not smoking you may be able to bring your blood sugar level back to normal.

Reviewed by Debra Powers, MS, RD, CDE, LDN, Senior Clinical Nutritionist

Pancreas

The pancreas is a small organ located behind the stomach.  Its main function is to produce enzymes used to digest food.  The pancreas also produces insulin, a hormone the body uses to move glucose out of the blood stream and into cells for energy.  For people with diabetes, the pancreas either does not produce enough insulin (or none at all) or the body is unable to use the insulin it produces properly.

(Reviewed by MGH Diabetes Center)

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