Nutrition, recipes

Beans, beans, the magical fruit…

By Kelsey Baumgarten
Dietetic Intern

What comes to mind when you hear the word “beans?” Maybe you think of chili, baked beans, minestrone soup, gallo pinto, burritos. Whatever you think about beans, you may not know how they are related to your health and blood sugar control.

While the old rhyme calls beans a magical “fruit,” they are, in fact, a vegetable! They’re part of a larger group of vegetables called legumes, which includes foods like black beans, chickpeas, lentils, and split peas. When counting carbohydrates, legumes should be counted as a starchy vegetable. However, if you can think of the rhyme, it may help you remember that a ⅓-cup serving of beans has a similar number of carbohydrates as a piece of fruit.

The more you eat, the more you toot…

Many people avoid beans because of their reputation for causing gastrointestinal discomfort. The gas related to eating beans is caused by the fiber and starches your body can’t break down. These are digested by the bacteria in your intestines.

The more you toot, the better you feel…

The fiber is part of what makes beans so good for you! Fiber can help lower your cholesterol and prevent constipation. Over time, your body will get used to it and you will notice less discomfort.

So let’s have beans at every meal!

You don’t need to have beans at every meal like the song suggests, but beans do make a great choice for balanced meals and snacks. Try swapping beans for some of your usual servings of pasta, potato, squash, and bread. You can even replace half of your starch with a half serving of legumes:

  • Eat a smaller portion of pasta, and add beans into the pasta sauce.
  • Mash black beans into a half serving of mashed potatoes.
  • Sprinkle beans on top of a thin-crust pizza
  • Add roasted chickpeas to your salad instead of croutons (just toss dry chickpeas in olive oil and salt, and broil until crispy— about 10 minutes)

Snacking on beans (15-30 g carbs)

  • 2 tablespoons of hummus or edamame dip + 6 whole grain crackers
  • ½ cup of lentil soup
  • ½ cup kidney beans, sprinkled with olive oil and Italian seasoning
  • ⅓ cup soy nuts + 1 piece fresh fruit

Don’t forget:
While legumes are a great source of plant protein, their carbohydrates will still raise your blood sugar. Legumes generally supply 15-20 grams of carbohydrates per serving. Be sure to check the nutrition label of whichever kind you are eating.

Beans can be a great addition to your diet. For increased fiber intake and heart-health benefits, aim to eat 3 or more servings every week. With so many nutrients per serving, they really are a “magical fruit”!

Did you know? You can use beans to make healthier baked goods and desserts!

Cannellini Carrot Muffins

  • BeanCarrotMuffin1 can* cannellini or kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsp canola oil
  • 2 tbsp molasses
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 1 ½ cups grated carrots
  • ½ cup walnuts
  • ¾ cup whole wheat flour
  • ¼ cup oats
  • ¾ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder

Preheat oven to 325° F. Grease a 12-cup muffin tin and set aside.

In a food processor, puree beans, eggs, oil, molasses, salt, and cinnamon until very smooth. Add carrots and nuts and blend on low speed until nuts and carrots are in small chunks. In a separate bowl, mix flour, oats, sugar, and baking powder. Add the bean mixture to the flour mixture and stir until just combined. Pour into the muffin tins and bake for 35-40 minutes.

*You can also use beans cooked from dry. 1 can = 1½ cups cooked beans.

Per muffin: 190 calories • 40g carb • 5g protein • 4g fiber • 7g fat

Black bean Chocolate Hummus
(who knew hummus could taste like dessert?)

BeanChocolateHummus
  • 1 can* black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 3 tbsp canola oil
  • 6 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 3 tbsp honey
  • ¼ tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼ tsp almond extract
  • 1 tbsp decaf coffee (or water)

Blend all ingredients in a food processor until smooth. Serves 8.

For a snack with 30g carbs, spread hummus over 2 graham cracker squares (1 full sheet), or use as dip for 1 serving of apple slices or strawberries.

Per serving (about 2 tbsp): 150 calories • 20g carb • 5g protein • 5g fiber • 7g fat

*You can also use beans cooked from dry. 1 can = 1½ cups cooked beans.

 (Post content reviewed by MGH Department of Nutrition and Food Services)
recipes

Apple Barley Salad

Pearled barley cooks quicker than hulled barley (hulled barley still has the bran of the grain attached and takes about an hour to cook). Though pearled barley is technically not a “whole grain,” it is still a good source of fiber. Avoid buying white pearled barley, it is more processed; instead, look for the variety that is “lightly pearled.”  Lightly pearled barley will be tan in color and has more fiber.

Ingredients:
½ cup lightly pearled barley, uncooked
1 tsp salt, divided
½ cup plain low-fat yogurt
1½ tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
½ tbsp Dijon mustard
¼ tsp black pepper
2 stalks celery, diced
1 apple, skin intact, diced into ½-inch pieces
¼ cup fresh mint, chopped
2 bunches arugula (about 6 cups)

Instructions:
Combine barley in a saucepan with 1½ cups water and ½ tsp salt and bring to boil (or see directions for cooking barley on package). Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer for about 30 minutes, until water is absorbed and barley is tender. Use a strainer to drain any excess water. Allow barley to cool.

Meanwhile, whisk together yogurt, olive oil, lemon juice, mustard, remaining ½ tsp salt and black pepper. Toss with celery, apple, mint and cooled barley. Divide arugula between bowls and top arugula with barley salad.

Yield: 4 servings

Nutrition Information per Serving:
Calories: 195 • Protein: 5g • Sodium: 650mg • Carbohydrate: 30g
Fiber: 6g • Fat: 6g • Sat Fat: 1g

Recipe adapted from Real Simple
Nutrition, Secret Ingredient

Profile: Mushrooms

By Reneé Ortolani
Dietetic Intern

When talking about fruit and veggie consumption, it’s usually recommended to look for the brightest colors of the bunch (i.e. bright red tomatoes, rich purple eggplant or green leafy spinach). The vibrant colors means the fruit or veggie is packed with vitamins and nutrients. While you’re painting your plate with color, leave room for the less vibrant hues too! While they don’t make for as striking a presentation as a carton of blueberries, paler veggies like cauliflower; onions and mushrooms are good sources of nutrients and antioxidants.

Okay, so technically mushrooms aren’t really vegetables, but rather a type of edible fungi. They have more in common with yeast than most of what you’ll find in the supermarket’s produce section. Some of the most common varieties of mushrooms include: portabello, shiitake, cremini, and chanterelle but there are thousands of different types of mushrooms. Mushrooms range in color from white to tan to golden and generally have a mild to strong (depending on variety) earthy flavor. Not all mushrooms are edible, though. Because some poisonous mushrooms look very similar to edible varieties, it’s best to leave mushroom picking to the expert mushroom hunters.

So why are mushrooms so great? Let’s break down their nutrients. Mushrooms are naturally low in sodium, fat, cholesterol, and calories making them a healthy option to add to any meal. Mushrooms are also packed with the B vitamins riboflavin, folate, thiamine, pantothenic acid, and niacin. They’re also the only non-fortified dietary source of vitamin D, a huge benefit to vegans. The list goes on with several minerals that mushrooms can add to the diet such as selenium, potassium, copper, iron, and phosphorus.

If you thought that was all that mushrooms offered, keep reading. Not only does this food from the fungi kingdom rate high on the nutrient scale, they provide a slew of possible health benefits as well. Beta-glucans (a type of fiber found in mushrooms) has recently been studied to evaluate its effect on improving insulin resistance and blood cholesterol levels, while lowering the risk of obesity. Choline, another nutrient, aids in sleep, muscle movement, learning, and memory, while also helping support fat absorption and reduce chronic inflammation. The mineral selenium delivers cancer-fighting qualities by assisting in detoxifying cancer-causing compounds in the body. It also prevents inflammation, lowers tumor growth rates, and is important for liver enzyme function. The list goes on with supporting cardiovascular health, improving immunity, aiding in weight management, and increasing satiety too.

With all of these nutrient benefits, where can you go wrong with incorporating mushrooms into your lifestyle? There are so many ways that mushrooms can be added to a dish. Whether replacing your burger with a grilled and marinated portabello, adding creminis to an egg frittata, or mixing shiitake mushrooms into your favorite pasta dish, this powerhouse of a “veggie” is sure to be a crowd pleaser.

So, what are you waiting for? Add mushrooms to your grocery list and try them in this delicious portobello mushroom burger recipe from the MGH Be Fit Program, the perfect addition to your palette this summer season!

Be Fit Basics: Stacked Summer Veggie Portobello Burger

Ingredients:

6 portobello mushrooms (any dirt brushed off with a paper towel), stems removed
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
4 tbsp olive oil, divided
4 rosemary sprigs (or 1 tsp dried rosemary)
3 peaches cut in half with peach pits removed
3 bell peppers cut in half with seeds and stems removed
3 small onions, skins removed and sliced in half (preserving onion rings)
1 lemon
Salt and pepper (salt estimated at ½ tsp)

Instructions:

Place mushroom caps in a large bowl; add balsamic vinegar and 2 tbsp of olive oil. Tear leaves off rosemary sprigs and add them to the bowl. Add salt and pepper and toss all ingredients until mushrooms are fully coated (Adding additional balsamic as needed). In another large bowl place peaches, peppers and onions. Cut lemon in half and squeeze juice into bowl. Add remaining 2 tbsp olive oil with along with salt and pepper; toss to combine.

Light grill; allow it to come to medium-high heat or when you can hold your hand about 5 inches above the grill (being careful not to burn your hand) for 3-5 seconds. The process for lighting your grill will vary depending on whether you have a charcoal or gas grill. [Note: If you don’t have a grill you can roast the mushrooms, peaches, peppers and onions on a large baking sheet in a 425 degree oven for about 30-40 minutes. (The cooking time may vary slightly depending on your oven.)]

Place mushrooms, peaches, peppers and onions on grill. Grill until slightly charred and cooked through, about 5-15 minutes. Turn vegetables once half way through cooking.

Assembly: On bottom of a wheat bun place peppers, onions, peaches and mushroom cap. Place other bun half on top

Yield: 6 serving

Nutrition Information per Serving (not including bun):

Calories: 180 • Protein: 4g • Sodium: 210mg • Carbohydrate 22g • Fiber: 5g •
Fat: 10g • Sat Fat: 1.5g

(Content reviewed by MGH Department of Nutrition and Food Services)

Health, Nutrition

What to Expect with the New FDA Food Label

By Aubrey Brophy, Dietetic Intern

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing new updates for the current Nutrition Facts label that appears on most food and beverage items. The new food label is meant to reflect the current nutrition issues Americans face, primarily overweight and obesity, lack of certain vitamins and minerals and increase readability and comprehension

What are the main changes?

  • Serving Sizes – The serving sizes seen at the top of the food label will reflect the actual portions most Americans consume. For example, food packages and beverages that can typically be consumed in one sitting, like a 20 oz bottle of soda, will reflect only one serving. Also, “Amount per Serving” will now be listed by the actual serving size, such as “amount per 1 cup.”
  • Format Changes – The calorie and serving size section will now be larger and bolder to emphasize the amount of calories that are actually in the item. Additionally, the percent daily value will be shifted to the left to help consumers understand the nutrient content of the item compared to the estimated daily needs.
  • Added Sugars – A new “added sugars” section will be included to help consumers identify which sugars are not naturally found in food items.
  • Fat – “Total Fat,” “Saturated Fat,” and “Trans Fat” will continue to be required, but “Calories from Fat” will be removed from the food label because it does not distinguish between healthy and unhealthy fats.
  • Potassium and Vitamin D – The new food label will now be required to list the amounts of potassium and vitamin D in the food or beverage item because these have become nutrients of concern in the U.S.
  • Vitamin C and Vitamin A – These vitamins will no longer be mandatory due to lack of concern for deficiencies (they may still be listed voluntarily).
  • Calcium and Iron ­– These nutrients will continue to be required on the food label because they are still of concern for the general population.

Below is a comparison of the current Nutrition Facts label and the proposed food label.

oldnew food labelWhen to Expect These Changes?

The new Nutrition Facts label is still under review by the FDA, so an official launch date is unknown at this time. Once the changes are effective, manufacturers will have two years to comply with any of the final requirements.

(Post content reviewed by MGH Department of Nutrition and Food Services)
Nutrition

Three Reasons to Cook More Meals at Home

Research shows that cooking more meals at home encourages healthy eating, but many people feel they don’t have time to cook dinner during the week. If time (or lack of it) is what’s holding you back, here are a couple of time-saving tips for getting a jump-start on your meal. Dedicate some time during the weekend to plan your menu and chop all the veggies you will need for the coming week. If you need to pull a meal together quickly, frozen veggies are a good choice since all the chopping and peeling has been done for you.

Cleaning up after the meal can sometimes be just as time-consuming as the prep work. Save time on the dishes by making meals that can be cooked in one pot or skillet. For example: stir-fry strips of chicken breast or other lean protein with seasonal veggies with a little olive oil in a large skillet for a quick and easy summer meal. A Croc-Pot® or other slow cooker is another great tool for making a variety of easy, one-pot meals.

Okay, now that we have a game plan, here are a few good reasons for making a habit out of cooking more at home:

  • Healthy Options: Many restaurant meals are high in calories, sodium, and fat. Not to mention the portions served are often larger than the recommended serving size. Cooking at home means you have control over what goes on your plate and can easily substitute in healthy ingredients (and even experiment with different flavors). Using measuring cups/spoons and kitchen scales can also help you keep an eye on portion size.
  • Save Money: Eating out several times a week can be expensive! Making more meals at home will save money in the long term. In many cases, leftovers from dinner can be easily reheated for lunch the next day. During the winter, you can easily make an extra batch of soup or chili and freeze in serving-size portions. Defrost later for an easy workday lunch or weeknight dinner.
  • Involve the Whole Family: Sharing a meal is a favorite way to bond with loved ones. Think of cooking at home as another opportunity for spending time with friends and family by making meal prep a group activity. This way one person isn’t expected to cook the whole dinner for everyone. Plus, involving kids in the kitchen has been known to help with develop healthy eating habits later in life.

If you’re new to cooking at home, start small. Try making just one meal a week at first. As you practice skills in the kitchen, you’ll develop confidence to cook more often. Bon appétit!

(Post content reviewed by MGH Department of Nutrition and Food Services)

Nutrition

Eating Healthy Away From Home

By Suzanne Russell-Curtis, RD, CDE
Bulfinch Medical Group

Dining out can be a fun time to relax with family and friends, however when trying to eat healthy the experience can become stressful. Restaurants are recognizing people are trying to eat healthier and will often indicate healthy options and accommodate special requests. However, learning how navigate a menu on your own can make the process a little easier. Here are some quick tips on making healthier choices at a restaurant.

Choose:

  1. Broiled, baked, grilled or sautéed
  2. Au jus (cooked in own juices)
  3. Fish, Poultry and Lean meats (Sirloin tips, eye of the round and Top round)
  4. Oil based salad dressing such as Oil and Vinegar
  5. Steamed vegetables
  6. Half or appetizer portions

Pass:

  1. Fried or crispy foods
  2. Cream or butter sauces
  3. Fatty cuts of Beef (New York strip, Porterhouse, Filet Mignon, T-bone and Prime rib)
  4. Creamy salad dressings and soups**
  5. Mashed potatoes or loaded baked potatoes
  6. High fat toppings (cheese, bacon, sour cream)
  7. Full portions

** Soups are often very high in sodium

Extra tips:

Popular restaurant chains now have web sites with nutrition information listed. Check it out and decide on your dish before you go to the restaurant. Once you get there be the first to order – you’ll be less tempted to change your mind.

If you’re headed to a restaurant that brings chips, bread or other goodies before the meal, tell your server you don’t want these tempting treats brought to the table.

Ask for a doggie bag to come at the same time as the meal. Place half of your meal in the box and close it up before you take your first bite. You’ll be less likely to open the box and put the food back on your dish (or eat it out of the box) then if you just cut the meal in half and leave it on your plate.

Have a healthy snack such as raw vegetables and hummus before you go to the restaurant. This will help you avoid over eating.

Uncategorized

Potato Basil Frittata

A frittata (similar to an omelet) can effortlessly transition from brunch to a quick weeknight dinner, being both elegant and easy.  Add a side salad to round out your meal.

Ingredients:
2 tbsp olive oil
4 red potatoes, peel left on, cubed
8 extra large eggs
¼ cup low fat milk or soymilk
½ cup basil, chopped
1/3 cup scallions, chopped
¼ cup grated pecorino romano or parmigiano reggiano cheese
3 ounces goat cheese, sliced into rounds
Pinch of salt and pepper

Instructions:
Heat a sauté pan on medium heat and then add olive oil. Add cubed potatoes and sauté, stirring occasionally, until potatoes are tender when pierced with a fork (about 15 minutes). Meanwhile in a separate bowl, whisk the eggs; then stir milk, basil, scallions, grated cheese, and salt and pepper into eggs. Turn on oven broiler.

Pour the egg mixture over the potatoes and cook on medium low heat for 3-5 minutes,
occasionally running a rubber spatula around the edges of the frittata to loosen. Frittata is ready for the broiler when eggs around the edge of the pan start to set, but the middle is still loose.

Top frittata with goat cheese rounds and place under the broiler for about 3 minutes or until eggs are set throughout. Run your spatula along the sides and bottom of the frittata to loosen from the pan and place on large plate or platter.

Yield: 8 servings

Nutrition Information per Serving:
Calories: 273 • Protein: 15g • Sodium: 327g • Carbohydrate: 18g • Fiber: 2g
Fat: 15.5g • Sat Fat: 6g

Nutrition

Nutrition 101: Carbohydrates

By Janelle Langlais
Dietetic Intern

Carbohydrates are the body’s instant source of fuel found in almost everything. Milk, cereal, bread, pasta, soda, juice, candy and sweets all contain carbohydrates, and even fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds. During digestion, carbohydrates are broken down into sugar molecules used as the body’s main source of fuel. The body stores these sugars in your muscles to provide energy during exercise, and in your liver to provide energy while you are sleeping or fasting. Carbohydrates are essential for proper nutrition; in fact, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that 45-65% of your diet come from carbohydrates daily.

It’s a common misconception that people with diabetes can’t eat carbohydrates. Everyone can and should eat carbohydrates for proper nutrition, as many options like whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and nuts are nutrient dense (meaning they have a lot of nutrients but few calories). Pairing carbohydrates with foods rich in protein and/or fiber helps the body maintain blood sugar. As protein is the body’s long-lasting fuel, it slows down the digestion process which helps to minimize the effects of carbohydrates on blood sugar. Protein helps make you feel fuller longer, leaving you more satisfied than if you just ate a carbohydrate alone. Fiber also has a similar effects on digestion and “fullness” as it slows down digestion and adds bulk, aiding in maintaining a more stable blood sugar. An apple with peanut butter is a great example of a balanced snack: the apple contains carbohydrates and fiber, and the peanut butter contains lots of protein and a small amount of carbohydrate and heart healthy fat.

Overall, the key is moderation and balance.  Focus on incorporating whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables into your diet. Opt for whole grain or whole wheat bread or pasta instead of white to increase your protein and fiber intake, creating more of a balanced plate. These foods also contain lots of vitamins and minerals which are essential to a healthy diet. Another thing to remember is to limit sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda and juice, and avoid refined sugars. These sugary drinks and processed foods contain large amounts of sugar and have little nutritional value. Opt for fruit-infused water or diet beverages to decrease your sugar and caloric intake for better health. Lastly, always remember is to be mindful of portion sizes! It is possible to have too much of a good thing, so always read your food labels and follow the serving size.

(Post content reviewed by the MGH Department of Nutrition and Food Services)
Nutrition

Healthy Holiday Swaps

By Veronica Salsberg, MS
Dietetic Intern

It’s estimated that approximately 26 million Americans, or just over 8% of the population, are living with diabetes.  Nearly 3 times as many Americans may have prediabetes.  Many people believe a diabetes diagnosis means the end to indulging in their favorite foods, making this festive time of year filled with holiday parties and traditional family meals suddenly feel especially stressful.  Yet others believe any attempts at maintaining a healthy diet during the holidays are doomed to fail. The truth is neither of these is the case! You can still enjoy celebrations with friends and family without that all-or-nothing mentality.

Heading out to a holiday party? Follow these tips to help you stay on track this season:

  • Stick to your normal eating routine as much as possible both leading up to the party and afterwards
  • Never go to a party or event hungry.  Have a small snack with a little protein, healthy carbohydrate and fat (such as a cup of low-fat or fat-free yogurt with fruit or raw veggies dipped in 2 tablespoons of hummus) beforehand
  • Hydrate! We often feel hungry when we’re dehydrated, so make sure you’re drinking water throughout the day
  • Don’t graze from the appetizer table.  Use a plate and serve yourself small portions
  • Use smaller plates to help control portions.  Stick with 1 small plate of appetizers and 1 small dessert (or split 2 small desserts with a friend or relative)
  • If you’re drinking alcohol*, alternate with water or seltzer.  Flavored, calorie-free seltzers are a fun and festive non-alcoholic beverage that won’t leave you feeling deprived (*Check with your doctor if drinking alcohol is ok. General recommendations are no more than 1 drink/day for women and no more than 2 drinks/day for men)
  • Bring your own healthy snacks to your next party.  If you’re hosting, provide your guests with plenty of healthy options!

Helping to cook the holiday feast this year? Talk to your loved ones about putting a healthier spin on traditional recipes. Save on calories and fat and boost flavor in mashed potatoes by swapping out cream and butter for low-fat Greek yogurt and fresh snipped chives. On stuffing duty? Use whole wheat bread for added fiber and nutrients, and replace the melted butter with olive or canola oil. Check out the recipes below for ideas for healthier, but still delicious, holiday side dishes!

Sizzled Green Beans with Crispy Prosciutto & Pine Nuts ~ EatingWell

This green bean dish is just under 100 calories per serving, making it a much healthier alternative to the traditional green bean casserole.

Mushroom and Leek Stuffing ~ MyRecipes

Full of fresh vegetables and herbs,  and with fewer than 200 calories per serving this stuffing is sure to satisfy your taste buds without breaking the calorie bank.

Rosemary Mashed Sweet Potatoes with Shallots ~ MyRecipes

Try mashed sweet potatoes as an alternative to traditional mashed potatoes this holiday season. Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of fiber and vitamin A.  Crispy shallots and fresh rosemary add flavor without adding to your waistline.

Butternut and Barley Pilaf ~EatingWell

Simple yet bursting with fresh flavors of parsley, lemon, and garlic, this dish has the added health benefits of whole grains from the barley and vitamin A from the butternut squash. It’s low in fat and calories and high in fiber which means you can indulge without guilt!

Mini Apple Pies with Cheddar ~ Eating Well

Save room for dessert! These adorable mini pies mean automatic portion control.   The white whole wheat flour, oats, pecans, and abundance of apples means each little pie has about 5 g of fiber!

Wishing you a happy, healthy, and tasty holiday season!

(Post reviewed by Debra Powers, MS, RD, CDE, LDN, Senior Clinical Nutritionist)
Fitness, Guest Post

My Be Fit Success Story

By Jina Rameau, RN, MPH
Project Specialist

I was new to the MGH community, just 3 months into my position. During new employee orientation, I heard about all the benefits we can access. One in particular really caught my attention:  the MGH Be Fit program. Be Fit is the MGH employee wellness program, a free 10-week program that focuses on helping employees learn to eat healthier and exercise more with guidance from nutritionists and personal trainers.

I knew I wanted to join the program, and began contacting the directors. There was one hiccup:  I was pretty new to my department, and the program requested teams of 15-25 people within your department. I remember thinking I don’t know enough people to get a group together! I explained my situation to one of the directors and promised my commitment to Be Fit. He advised I could possibly join another team! I was ecstatic, and couldn’t wait to be a part of the program.

I joined the team at the Diabetes Research Center (team name: Sweet Success).  The time flew by with weekly team breakout sessions with our nutritionist, Debra, and personal trainer, Pete. Weekly rallies were also held to review team stats for submission of food logs, the total time we spent exercising, how many times we practiced relaxation response techniques, and number of steps taken. There were a total of 6 teams, and Sweet Success remained within the Top 3 throughout the 10 weeks. We felt a sense of achievement whenever we took a trophy home.

In addition to 1 hour weekly strength training sessions with Pete, I also participated in the weekly group exercise classes at the gym right next to the hospital. I fell head over heels for Zumba:  a fun, effective workout system featuring dance moves set to Latin and International music.  As a result of Be Fit resources, I learned relaxation techniques (i.e. deep breathing and visualization) as well as nutrition facts like how to read a food label, portion size and healthy snacking.  I lost over 15lbs and continue to include exercise in my daily routine. It’s a lifestyle!

Go Team! Sweet Success'Be Fit Trophies