Announcements

Fitting Fitness in Fall Twitter Chat

MGH logo with blue circle

The beginning of fall is a time of change. Changes in the foliage, changes to your schedule, change in the weather . . . changes in your exercise routine?

Join us on Monday, October 7th at 2pm EST for a chat on adapting your fitness routine to the change in seasons and strategies for fitting fitness into a busy fall schedule. Mike Bento, Personal Trainer at the Clubs at Charles River Park, will be leading the discussion and answering your questions.

Follow #MGHDSME for more details. If you’d like to submit questions ahead of time, contact diabetesviews@partners.org.

Fitness, Guest Post

Changing Seasons, Changing Habits

By Monica

Changing the way we do things, especially if it’s something we’ve done for a long time, is the hardest task anyone can ask.  We create a comfort zone of tranquility, serenity and calmness that our mind comes to prefer.  But it is not always the best.

As we get older, our appetite changes.  Our metabolism is different too, and we burn fewer calories.  We need to change the way we eat and learn to substitute in healthier foods.  And in order to continue to maintain a good healthy lifestyle, our daily routine needs to shift in a more active and productive way.  It’s not always easy, but it can be done with support from friends and family.

Regular activity is not just for little kids or young people – we all need to be active, and it’s never too late to start.  We had such a long winter; now that spring is finally here we have a chance to go outside and enjoy the warmer weather.  It’s also a perfect opportunity to change some of your habits.  Rather than just sitting in the sun, go for a little walk.  If you can, bring along a friend or co-worker.  You’ll be doing something good for yourself and getting a chance to be social at the same time.

Is there an activity you’ve always wanted to try?  Go for it!  Just about everyone has something they’ve said they’d like to try “someday.”  Well, why not now?  If you go to a gym, ask if they will let you try out a class to see if you like it.  There are also some programs in Boston that plan community fitness events or offer free classes like yoga and Zumba in spring and summer.  The Boston Natural Areas Network is another great group that organizes community activities like bike rides, canoeing and gardening – great opportunities for families to do something healthy and active together.

Let the change in seasons inspire you to get out there and get moving.

Health

Motivating Lifestyle Change

By Sandy O’Keefe
Program Manager, Chronic Disease Education

Rock climbing. Photo Credit: Bryan Wintersteen

Question: How many Diabetes educators does it take to change a light bulb?
Answer: One, but the light bulb really has to want to change.

How many times have you vowed to lose weight or start running only to have it fall to the wayside a few days later? You may blame it on lack of willpower, not having enough time, etc., but it’s time to give yourself a break; it happens to many of us! However, if you fine tune your action plan a bit, you can set yourself up for success.

First you need to figure out what motivates you to make changes in your life. This needs to be a powerful motivator— saying something like “I want to look better” isn’t strong enough to hold your attention. Instead, “I want to lose weight so I can walk my daughter down the aisle at her wedding next May” or “so I can spend time laughing and playing tag with my children outside this summer” are examples of motivators that will help you emotionally stay attached and focused on your goals. Equally important, this motivator must come from you personally.  It’s not enough to say, “I am doing this so my wife stops nagging me to lose weight.” Keep digging inside yourself until you find your own personal motivator, then write it down and keep it somewhere you can read it any time you need to remind yourself why you’re making this change.

In order to be successful at behavior change, the focus should be on immediate attainable goals rather than long term results. For example, when you say that you want to lose weight you are defining what you hope to experience in the future. Weight loss is the outcome you hope to achieve in the long run, but it’s not the goal. Think about the steps you will need to take before you experience the outcome. For example, maybe you need to invest in a pair of sneakers or join a gym. These are things that you can do in the immediate future to get started.

Goals should always be “S.M.A.R.T.” This is an acronym that stands for Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Reasonable and Time-based. A S.M.A.R.T. goal might be, “I will buy a new pair of running sneakers from Sally’s Sneakers on Sunday May 6, 2012.” Consider what might get in the way of this goal and adjust as needed. Again, I suggest writing your goal down and having it in a place where you can see it to remind yourself.

From time to time assess the success you’ve had with each goal. You might say to yourself:  “last week my goal was to buy a pair of sneakers— how successful was I with this goal?” Goals may seem small at first, but each one builds upon the success of the one before it.  As they link together, you’ll start to believe, “hey, maybe I can stick to my plan this time!” 

You may want to ask a friend or family member to be a support person for you to help you stay on track. Having a health coach is also a great way to set a clear S.M.A.R.T action plan. Coaches aid you in identifying those strengths you possess that can help you change your behavior. Once you begin to realize that you really do have the power to change, you will be well on your way to making a behavior change that will help you realize your long-term vision.

Photo Credit: Bryan Wintersteen