Fitness

Low-cost Fitness Options

A regular exercise routine is a powerful tool in your diabetes management plan.  Exercise can lower blood sugar, and helpful for losing/maintaining a healthy weight.  Going to the gym or health club isn’t a great fit for everyone, though.  They can be intimidating for one (especially if you’re just getting started), and the closest gym might still be too difficult to get to often enough to make it worthwhile.  Then there’s cost.  Memberships can be expensive, and some places charge extra for certain fitness classes.  If you’re trying to save money, exercising at home may be a better fit.

But what about access to equipment like weights and exercise machines?  If you have space you can purchase your own exercise machine or a set of weights, but again this might not be an option if saving money is a concern.  If you do have a little budget for fitness equipment, a set of resistance bands (with a door anchor), jump ropes and a stability ball are versatile, low-cost choices.  In reality you don’t need any equipment to exercise (a routine made of bodyweight exercises can be effective and challenging), or you can incorporate some items you probably already have at home into your routine.

Hand weights => Canned goods

Cans of soup are a good option for arm raises or other upper body exercises that use light hand weights.  If you need more challenge you can use a milk jug filled with water.  The more water you add, the heavier the weight. 

Gliding Disks => Paper plates

Gliding discs are circular plastic discs used to slide hands or feet (depending on the activity) along the floor when doing body weight exercises like mountain climbers, lunges, or.  A set of paper plates or a dish towel will work just as well at home.

Squat machine => Wall

Yes, even a blank wall can be used as a piece of fitness equipment!  To do a wall squat, stand with your back against the wall and slide down until your thighs are parallel with the floor, moving your feet out so your knees are bent at 90 degrees.  Hold.  As you get stronger, you’ll be able to hold the squat longer.

Stair machine => Stairs

Another piece of fitness equipment you probably already have in your home or office.  Skip the elevator and take the stairs whenever possible.

Post content reviewed by the Clubs at Charles River Park
Nutrition, recipes

Be Fit Basics: Quinoa Breakfast Cereal

Ingredients:
11/2 cups skim milk
1 cup uncooked quinoa
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon, plus more for serving
4 teaspoons honey, agave, or maple syrup
20 walnut halves
1 cup sliced strawberries

Instructions:
In a medium saucepan, combine skim milk, quinoa, salt, and cinnamon and bring to a boil, covered. Reduce heat to low and cook until milk is absorbed and quinoa is tender (about 20 minutes).

Remove pan from heat and let stand for 5 minutes, covered. Fluff with fork.

Divide quinoa evenly among 4 bowls. Top each with 1 teaspoon of honey, agave, or maple syrup, 5 or 6 walnut halves, and 1/4 cup of sliced strawberries. Use additional milk as desired.

Yield: 4 servings

Nutrition Information per Serving:
Calories: 300 • Protein: 10g • Sodium: 190mg • Carbohydrate: 50g • Fiber: 7g • Fat: 8g • Sat Fat: 0.5g

Recipe adapted from epicurious.com
Nutrition

Personalized Nutrition- Is the Future Here Yet?

By Robert Dunn, Dietetic Intern

Is the secret to a perfect diet hidden in your own body?

Personalized nutrition is a modern approach to nutrition that aims to prescribe specific diets based on biomarkers. Biomarkers are substances that provide information on a person’s condition, and can be used to measure disease risk. By assessing their impact on nutrition, medical professionals may be able to precisely determine the best diet for improving a person’s health.

The role of personalized nutrition is evolving quickly. Many researchers are optimistic that it may provide a breakthrough in the treatment of certain diseases. One of the diseases being closely studied is diabetes, a condition that affects over 29 million people in the United States. Additionally, over 80 million people are estimated to have prediabetes, putting them at risk for developing diabetes later in life. Diet and lifestyle have always been important for diabetes management, and personalized nutrition may soon play a key role in this process.

Researchers in Denmark recently published a study on personalized nutrition in diabetes treatment. Their goal was to determine the most effective weight loss diet for people that were diabetic, pre-diabetic, or neither (healthy group). To do so, they divided patients from prior weight loss studies into those groups based on two biomarkers: fasting insulin and fasting blood glucose. Once the patients were assigned groups, the researchers could then compare weight loss data to determine if any diet had a particularly strong effect on any specific group.

After comparing the data, several trends became clear. Patients in the diabetic group lost more weight on a low-carbohydrate diet that was high in plant-based fats like olive oil. Meanwhile, the healthy group was more successful with a low fat, high-carbohydrate diet. Finally, pre-diabetic patients who followed a diet high in fiber (fruits, vegetables, whole grains) lost more weight than those who followed a control diet. Based on these results, the researchers concluded that biomarkers like fasting blood sugar could be helpful in planning diet interventions for patients with either diabetes or pre-diabetes.

The results of this study seem promising, and may offer insight into weight loss strategies for people with diabetes or pre-diabetes. However, personalized nutrition is an emerging area of research and it is important we don’t make conclusions based on limited evidence. The study’s authors stated that next steps include “research to explore additional biomarkers…which may help to more effectively customize the right diet for specific individuals.”

In the meantime, people with diabetes and pre-diabetes should be encouraged to optimize their nutrition and physical activity. Nutrition counseling with qualified professionals has been shown to improve the health of people with these conditions. Anyone interested nutrition for diabetes management should consider meeting with a Registered Dietitian (RD).  Registered Dietitians are nutrition experts who help people of all backgrounds use diet to meet their medical needs.

To schedule an appointment with an RD from Massachusetts General Hospital, contact the Department of Nutrition and Food Services by calling 617-726-2779.

Content reviewed by Melanie Pearsall, RD, LDN, CDE
Health

Understanding Emotional Eating

Have you ever come home after a stressful day and ended up eating a pint of Chunky Monkey?  Or maybe you’ve mindlessly eaten a bag of chips at your desk willing the workday to go by faster?  Both of these examples are types of emotional eating:  eating for reasons other than hunger.  While eating when you’re  hungry addresses a physical need (providing the body with food in order to function), emotional eating uses food to satisfy an emotional need.  Some common causes of emotional eating include stress, anger, boredom and loneliness.    Emotional eating can affect your diabetes management because often the foods eaten are high in sugar, fat and calories.  This can raise blood sugar and make it hard to lose weight.

So how can you tell if you’re eating because you’re hungry or because you’re stressed out?  Physical hunger comes on gradually and can be satisfied by any type of food. You stop feeling hunger when you have eaten enough to feel full.  Emotional “hunger” comes on very quickly and is focused on a strong craving for a particular food, taste or texture. Emotional eating is also often mindless and can lead to feelings of guilt afterward.

Now that we know the difference between physical and emotional hunger, here are some strategies to help manage emotional eating:

  • Know your triggers – If you know what it is that causes you to eat (e.g. boredom, stress), you can take action to prevent mindless munching before it begins. Use another activity to distract yourself from wanting to eat. Try going for a walk, talking to a friend or loved one, or listening to music.
  • Pause – Before reaching for the bag of chips, stop and think: am I hungry, or am I bored? Wait 10 minutes and see if you are still truly hungry.
  • Eat smaller portions –   If you wait 10 minutes and still can’t stop thinking about those chips, have a smaller, individual portion to keep you from overeating.
  • Practice mindful eating – Slow down and take the time to really enjoy the smell, tastes and textures of your favorite foods. Try not to multi task – make eating your only activity.
  • Seek help if you need it – Emotional eating can sometimes be a symptom of depression or anxiety.  If you feel this may be the case, talk to your healthcare provider, a diabetes educator or a mental health specialist.

Post content reviewed by Jen Searl, MLS, CHWC

Nutrition

Low-Calorie Options for Adding Flavor to Water

By Melanie Pearsall RD, LDN, CDE
Sr. Clinical Nutritionist

Water is the healthiest drink for people of all ages. Drinking enough water is an important part of helping your body “detoxify,” and even mild dehydration can cause problems with concentration.  Americans tend to drink a lot of beverages other then water. Many of these drinks have a lot of added sugars and fat’s which are high in calories and cause weight gain. But the one thing these beverages have is flavor!   Many people know it’s important to drink water and stay hydrated but hate to drink “plain” water. Here are some suggestions to help even the pickiest water drinker succeed:

  • Flavor your water with orange or lemon slices, cucumber slices, berries or fresh herbs like mint or basil
  • Try flavored or plain seltzer waters! Sometimes that added fizz is enough to tickle your taste buds.
  • Herbal teas are a great way to flavor water. I often add an herbal tea bag to my cold water bottle and let it steep slowly, flavoring the water. Tea also provides an extra health benefit from anti-oxidants.
  • Add small amounts of sugar free type flavorings like Crystal Light to your water. I suggest people start off with just enough to add some flavor but without making it overly sweet.
  • Buy a water purifier for your home or individual bottle. This can make the water taste clean and refreshing as it removes some of the impurities that cause an aftertaste
  • If you like to drink pre-flavored water just double check the label to make sure it is low calorie (fewer than 10 calories per serving)
Article originally appeared in Summer 2013 DiabetesViews
Nutrition, Uncategorized

Other Whole Grains

By now you’ve probably heard about the many health benefits of whole grains (and hopefully started making half your grains whole grains).  Brown rice, quinoa and whole wheat bread are some of the go-to whole grain options but there are many, many other kinds to choose from.  Here are some other types of whole grains to try.

Barley

Barley is a really good source of fiber.  In fact, it has the most fiber of all the whole grains.  Barley has been shown to help lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and keep blood sugar stable.  When shopping for barley, look for hulled barley rather than “pearled” barley.  Although pearled barley cooks much faster (about 30 minutes vs. an hour for hulled barley), pearled barley has had much of the bran scraped off.  Without the bran, it is no longer considered a whole grain.

Serving ideas:  Barley can be eaten alone as a hot cereal, used to thicken soups and stews, or as a substitute for rice.

Buckwheat

Like quinoa, buckwheat isn’t really a grain (it’s a seed).  It’s also not a type of wheat – it’s more closely related to rhubarb.  Buckwheat is high in protein and gluten-free, making it a good option for people with Celiac or other gluten sensitivity.  The kernels (called “groats”) cook in about 20 – 30 minutes.  If you’re short on time, look for toasted buckwheat groats (called “kasha”) which typically cooks in 15-20 minutes.

Serving ideas:  Cooked groats can be eaten alone in place of oatmeal, or added to salads or soups.  Buckwheat flower is used to make soba noodles.

Oats

Oats are a good source of fiber and are known to help lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and blood pressure.  Some different types of oats you may find in the store include oat groats, steel cut oats, and rolled oats.  The difference between each of these is how they’re processed.  Oat groats are whole oat kernels.  Steel cut oats are oat groats that have been cut into smaller pieces, while rolled oats are groats that have been steamed and flattened.  Processed oats cook faster, but here’s the good news:  all processed oats are still whole grains!  Even instant oatmeal counts as a whole grain, but read the nutrition facts label very carefully and choose brands that do not have a lot of added salt and sugar.

Serving idea:  Make up a batch of this Be Fit Power Granola for a healthy snack

One final thing to remember:  whole grains are still high in carbohydrate.  While you’re trying out new whole grain options, remember to pay attention to portion size.

 Content reviewed by Melanie Pearsall, RD, CDE