My Story

My Story: Journey Through Weight Loss Surgery

By Isabel

When I was diagnosed with diabetes in 2010, it was a total shock. Even though diabetes runs in both sides of my family (both my grandmothers had it as well as some aunts and uncles), I never felt I would get diabetes. My primary care provider reassured me that WE would get through this and started me on metformin and I learned how to use a glucometer. At the time I thought I’ll just learn what I need to do. When I got home and started looking through my materials, it hit me hard. I broke down and started to cry. I felt that diabetes was a death sentence. I was also angry because I had been going to Weight Watchers and started losing weight! The diagnosis was devastating, but I said: I. Will. Beat. This.

I continued with Weight Watchers, but started thinking what else could I do to help me lose more weight and control my diabetes. So I thought about gastric bypass surgery. Would it be a good option for me, am I thinking this is an easy way out? So I started doing research about diabetes and weight loss surgery. I attended support groups and talked to people about how they felt after having the surgery. I realized that I was going to be 40 in a few years. I said I wanted to be healthy plus, I wanted to have children and would need to be healthy for them. Because of these reasons I decided to move forward with the surgery. My primary care physician was very supportive of my decision and gave me recommendations for weight loss surgeons at a local hospital.

My surgery went well with no complications, however I started to have doubts during my first month of recovery. You can’t eat anything except liquids, and the protein shakes I was supposed to drink made me feel sick. That, and dealing with the pain, made me feel depressed and defeated. To get through it, I kept reminding myself why I had the surgery to begin with. At my first month follow up I had lost 40 pounds and my A1C had dropped way down. I was able to stop taking metformin and my blood pressure medication. Beyond that, I started feeling better and noticed my clothes feeling looser.

As I continued to lose weight eventually I did plateau, but I was ready for it. I kept up with my healthy eating habits, making adjustments until I reached a weight range I felt comfortable with. I had my surgery in 2012, and I’ve lost a total of 95 pounds. Much of my success comes from the lessons learned from Weight Watchers and the “no guilt” attitude of my support group. I have gained a few pounds above my goal range, but it’s okay – I know I can lose the weight again and what I need to do to get there.

Diabetes was like a hit below the belt, but never once did I say “Why me?!” I know it will always be there, and it may come back down the line. For me, gastric bypass was a tool to use to control my weight and beat diabetes. Since my surgery, I have more confidence, am more accepting of my body, and have more energy. I’ve become an educator and advocate for taking charge of your own health. Gastric bypass was a good fit for me, but it’s not for everyone. If you are considering surgery, I encourage you to educate yourself about the different types of surgery available and talk to people who have done it. Do some research to prepare yourself for what happens afterward, and make sure you surround yourself with a strong support network. Do not let anyone make you feel ashamed for having weight loss surgery. Your health is yours, and in the end it’s about you, not them.

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