Depression as a Barrier to Diabetes Self-Care

July 30, 2015 at 10:35 am | Posted in Health | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , ,

By Christina Psaros, Ph.D
Department of Psychiatry

Depression is a medical illness characterized by pervasive feelings of sadness and/or the inability to experience pleasure or joy. Other symptoms of depression include feeling tired or without energy, reduced appetite, difficulty concentrating or making decisions, feelings of worthlessness or guilt, and hopelessness. People with diabetes have relatively high rates of depression, which can interfere with their ability to manage their diabetes.

Effectively managing diabetes requires a number of complex steps that may include regular meetings with a health care provider, monitoring of blood sugar, taking medications, and adhering to diet and physical activity guidelines. Depression may interfere with some or all of these behaviors. For example, difficulty concentrating may make it difficult to remember to take medications. Feeling tired or without energy can make it difficult to engage in physical activity or prepare healthful meals, while changes in appetite may it difficult to eat healthful foods. Feelings of hopelessness can make people feel like giving up rather than continue with self-care efforts.

Help is available! Research shows that psychotherapy can help alleviate symptoms of depression and help individuals with diabetes better adhere to their self-care regimen. Antidepressant medications can help. Talk to your Certified Diabetes Educator or primary healthcare provider if you are struggling with your diabetes self-care or if you think you may be depressed. They may refer you to the Massachusetts General Hospital Behavioral Medicine Program, which consists of a team of psychologists specializing in helping individuals with chronic illnesses like diabetes. If you are interested in making an appointment yourself, call the Psychiatry Access Line at 617-724-5600 or visit our website.

Leave a Comment »

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: