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Be Fit Basics: Roasted Winter Vegetables

This recipe from the MGH Be Fit program is an easy way to enjoy seasonal vegetables.

Ingredients:
1 pound carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
1 pound parsnips, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
1 large sweet potato, cut into 1-inch cubes
1 small butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1-inch cubes
3 tablespoons olive oil
½ teaspoon kosher salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper

Instructions:
Set the oven to 425 degrees. Divide the vegetables between two sheet pans (space out in a single layer).  Drizzle equally with olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Roast until vegetables are tender (about 25 to 35 minutes), tossing them once with a metal spatula about halfway through the cooking process.

Note: Using two sheet pans, instead of one, will allow for even cooking. Overcrowding the pan will prevent the vegetables from caramelizing.

Yield:  8 servings

Nutrition Information per Serving:
Calories: 180 • Protein: 3g • Sodium: 200mg • Carbohydrate: 34g • Fiber: 8g
Fat: 5g • Sat Fat: 1g

Recipe adapted from Ina Garten
recipes

Meatball Mummy Crescent Bites

trick or treat ghostCelebrate Halloween with this festive appetizer recipe from the Pediatric Diabetes Clinic

Kitchen Tools:

Knife or Pizza Cutter
Parchment paper
Large cookie sheet

Ingredients:
1 can (8 oz) refrigerated crescent dinner rolls
20 frozen cooked turkey meatballs, thawed
Ketchup or mustard
Marinara sauce (1 oz or 2 tablespoons = 4 gm Carb)

Directions:
Heat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Put piece of parchment paper on work surface (counter).  Unroll dough onto parchment paper, press out perforations to make one sealed large rectangle.  Cut into 4 small rectangles with knife or pizza cutter

Using knife or pizza cutter, cut each rectangle into 10 strips. You will have 40 strips of dough after all 4 small rectangles cut.

Wrap 2 strips of dough around each meatball to look like “bandages”.

Separate “bandages” near one end to show meatball “face”. Place wrapped meatballs on ungreased large cookie sheet.

Bake 13 to 17 minutes or until dough is light golden brown and meatballs are hot. With ketchup or mustard, draw “eyes” on mummy bites.

Serve warm with marinara sauce if desired.

Prep time: 15 min lTotal time: 30 minutes l Makes: 20 servings l Serving Size: 1 meatball l Carbs per serving: 7 grams

Recipe amended from Pillsbury.com/recipes
Health

Back to School Tips

By Leah Berthold, RN, CDE
MassGeneral Hospital for Children Pediatric Endocrine Unit

Blank Chalk Board

Have you begun getting ready to send your child back to school?  As the beginning of the  school year comes closer, here are some important things to remember:

  • Make sure you have a current Diabetes Medical Management plan (school orders) in place before the first day of school.
  • Make an appointment with the school nurse to review the plan and bring all supplies needed to school before school starts. Meeting the nurse before school starts will help build a relationship and confidence for you, your child and the nurse.  Refer to the box below for a list of supplies to keep at school.
  • Be sure your child has a 504 plan in place. Review this plan every year.
  • Give the school a hypoglycemia or “low” box with glucagon/glucose tablets/juice or whatever you prefer to treat low blood sugar
  • Be sure all school personnel, including bus drivers and coaches, are educated about Type 1 Diabetes and know what to do for low blood sugar.

 

School Supplies Box

Nutrition, recipes

Be Fit Basics : Mango Black Bean Salad

This easy salad recipe from the MGH Be Fit Program is a great use of the leftover grain from last night’s dinner. If you don’t have a cooked grain, substitute fresh or frozen corn kernels instead.  If you can’t find fresh mango, look for frozen cubed mango in the freezer section of your grocery store.  Dislike cilantro? Substitute another green herb, like parsley.

Ingredients:
1 mango, chopped and peeled (or about 1½ to 1¾ cups)
½ cup thinly sliced green onions (scallions), the white and green parts
½ cup cooked grain (use leftover rice, quinoa, etc.) or corn kernels
¼ cup finely chopped cilantro
2 tbsp fresh tomato salsa (or diced tomato)
1-15 ounce can low- sodium black beans, rinsed and drained
juice of 1 lime
2 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp salt (or to taste)
¼ tsp black pepper

Instructions:
In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and toss gently to mix.

Yield:  Serves 6

Nutrition Information per Serving (about 2/3 cup – nutrition information calculated with brown rice):  Calories:  160 • Protein:  5g • Sodium:  250mg
Carbohydrate: 27g • Fiber:5g • Fat: 5g • Sat Fat:1g

Recipe adapted from Cooking Light.  Originally posted on mghbefit.com
Guest Post, My Story

My Story: Nothing Holding Me Back

By Anne-Maria

I’ve had Type 1 Diabetes for 49 years – next April will be my 50th diaversary.  When I was diagnosed in the 60’s/70’s, there wasn’t as much information about diabetes out there as there is now.  But still, having diabetes never held me back from anything I wanted to do.  I still travel, and I stayed out late in my 20’s and 30’s like any other young person would.  I strongly believe that diabetes is just a part of life.  The key is to accept it and make it part of your routine.

There are professional hockey players who have diabetes.  Gary Hall, Jr. has Type 1 Diabetes and he swam the 50-meter freestyle at the Olympics.  They didn’t let diabetes stop them; they made it work.  Put your sight on what you want to do and figure out how to do it (I just don’t know if they can send you into space yet).  People are happy to work with you if you talk to them about your needs.  When I was still in school, we went on ski trip to the Alps.  At the time, they didn’t have refrigerators in the hotel rooms so I stored my insulin in the one in the kitchen.  I got to know the kitchen staff pretty well and they were happy to accommodate me.  Nobody has ever said “no” when asked to help.

The only time my health factored into any of my life choices was when I decided not to become a physician.  Sleep is very important for me and I knew I wouldn’t be able to function with the little bit of sleep med students get.  But again, it was my choice based on what I needed to take care of my own health.  I know my body inside and out, so I know when something isn’t right and how to adapt.  When I have late meetings, I’ve learned to check my blood sugar and drink some juice before it starts so I don’t go low.

My biggest piece of advice for parents or anyone who has been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes is:  take a deep breath and relax.  If you were diagnosed as an adult, know there’s nothing abnormal about what you have.  You can maintain your regular routine without much extra effort.  The only time I need to pay more attention to my blood sugar is when I’m sick.  I might have to take some extra time off from work to recover these days, but that could be because I’m getting older.

If you’re a parent, let your kids be kids.  Let them have fun at parties and eat a small piece of cake like the other kids (maybe take of some of the frosting first).  Don’t stress too much about what they eat.  You don’t have to make big formal meals.  Sometimes when I get home late I’ll have cereal and fruit for dinner.  Just use common sense and think about what you need to do to cover it with insulin.